General

By the end of 2001/the beginning of 2002, this complex and challenging project got under way. At the start, the ambition level was set to four “strategic value drivers” (Identity, Added Value, Adaptability, and Sustainability), a budget, and a very broad environmental programme. This was linked to a final delivery by mid-2005.

Realisation of this complex project was only possible by implementing a clear phasing, and to have design and implementation run partially simultaneously. Since Shell is a dynamic organisation (for instance, during the realisation of this project the modified organisation structure of Shell played a role, with as final result the head office in The Hague; this instead of two head offices in The Hague and London), both during the design process and during the realisation phase we had to anticipate on the wishes of the client.

Finally, we chose to apply construction management. This means that we do not work with a main contractor, but with a construction manager (in this case Bovis Lend Lease) that leads the design and construction process. Thereby the work was not outsourced as a whole, but split up in parts (for example: initial construction, inside walls, floor covering, climate installations, and ceilings). Thus the implementation could start whereas the design process had not yet been fully completed.

Over half a year after the start of the project, the first outsourcings were behind us and the renovation at the first two floors of building C16 started.

This approach does indeed require huge flexibility and a quick response of all parties, therefore also of the consultants. We have solved this by working with a front office at the construction site (being permanently present at the construction for consultations on both the design and implementation issues), as well as a back office at our Rijswijk office for the elaboration.

This approach also requires a strict cost control. This in order to prevent that at the final partial projects the budgets would no longer suffice. In order to support the financial controller of Shell, one of our employees has been involved in the cost control of the installation technique during the full course.

The project contains various buildings that are part of the complete Shell district. Some buildings will be further elaborated in this presentation as project parts.

Shell-hotel-low

Carel van Bylandtlaan C16 - C30
This concerned a general renovation and workplace flexibilisation of a monumental office building. The main objective was adding in a “Learning Centre”, a mini-university for the top-management of Shell. Mostly these kind of educational institutes are situated in a quiet, rural environment, far away from daily hectic life of the work floor. Shell consciously chooses for situating it in the Head Office, immediately under the offices of the management, and therewith underlines the importance and the image of Shell as a learning organisation.
Oversized royal stairs lead the visitor from the main entrance to the reception and foyer of the “Learning Centre” located on the first floor. Since the glass façades have been removed here and the floors were expanded, an interesting dimensional quality was added to this high hall.

The original structure of the building was elaborated as a “street” that continues into the adjacent, oldest office building of the Shell complex and is also a national monument (around 30,000 m2). All facilities, such as meeting rooms, restaurant, private lunchrooms, coffee terrace, reading table, and prayer room receive a recognisable location in this “street”. The somewhat cold, distant, closed, monumental atmosphere changes into a more relaxed, lively, informal, open, and warm total.
Inconspicuous acoustic facilities reduce the echo and enable the multiple use of the “street”. The office floors were designed with closed rooms, because of which long, unattractive corridors emerged and it was difficult to orientate yourself. The new design is a combination of open workplaces and transparent office rooms. The openness that is thus created does more credit to the original setup of the building.

Shell-C30-low

Carel van Bylandtlaan C23
This concerned a complete renovation of an office building dating back to before WWII (total around 30.000 m2), which in accordance with the current standards (high requirements to the inside climate) was renovated. During the Metamorphosis Project, once again various adaptations have taken place in this building. Special about this part of the project during the transformation in the 1990s is the short preparation time (design up to specifications around four months), and the short implementation time (around seven months) because of the planned removal. An almost complete demolition of the ceilings, walls, and corresponding installations has taken place. Existing asbestos cement main channels have been replaced.

Carel van Bylandtlaan C23 extension
At the Bachmanstraat and the Carel van Bylandtlaan, where old office buildings were located, an extension to the existing building was realised: building C23 extension. The three top layers of the building are office spaces; the lower layer serves as foyer. This room is part of the underground square and is connected to building C5 and the car park. The building mainly acts as an office, added with a number of specific rooms, such as meeting rooms, archive room, fitness room, etc.

Carel van Bylandtlaan C5
Building C5 (new construction) consists of five construction layers and a roof construction with a total gross floor surface of around 12,000 m2. Via the underground centre square the building is linked to building C16 as well as the accommodation building. Building C5 mainly serves as an office building, added with a number of functionally designed rooms, such as meeting rooms, smoking rooms, server room, etc.

Underground parking
The car park to be built newly (310 cars) below the Carel van Bylandtlaan at the location of the main entrance of building C16 and Bachmanstraat, consists of four underground layers and is with regard to entrance and exit linked to the existing car park under building C16.

Linking buildings
At the centre of the district an underground square was realised that constitutes the logistical connection between the buildings and the car park.

Shell-kantoor-low

Installations, Flexibility & Sustainability

By the end of 2001/the beginning of 2002, this complex and challenging project got under way. At the start, the ambition level was set to four “strategic value drivers” (Identity, Added Value, Adaptability, and Sustainability), a budget, and a very broad environmental programme. This was linked to a final delivery by mid-2005.

Realisation of this complex project was only possible by implementing a clear phasing, and to have design and implementation run partially simultaneously. Since Shell is a dynamic organisation (for instance, during the realisation of this project the modified organisation structure of Shell played a role, with as final result the head office in The Hague; this instead of two head offices in The Hague and London), both during the design process and during the realisation phase we had to anticipate on the wishes of the client.

Finally, we chose to apply construction management. This means that we do not work with a main contractor, but with a construction manager (in this case Bovis Lend Lease) that leads the design and construction process. Thereby the work was not outsourced as a whole, but split up in parts (for example: initial construction, inside walls, floor covering, climate installations, and ceilings). Thus the implementation could start whereas the design process had not yet been fully completed.

Over half a year after the start of the project, the first outsourcings were behind us and the renovation at the first two floors of building C16 started.

This approach does indeed require huge flexibility and a quick response of all parties, therefore also of the consultants. We have solved this by working with a front office at the construction site (being permanently present at the construction for consultations on both the design and implementation issues), as well as a back office at our Rijswijk office for the elaboration.

This approach also requires a strict cost control. This in order to prevent that at the final partial projects the budgets would no longer suffice. In order to support the financial controller of Shell, one of our employees has been involved in the cost control of the installation technique during the full course.

The project contains various buildings that are part of the complete Shell district. Some buildings will be further elaborated in this presentation as project parts.